Stories tagged: twitter chat

#FoodPrize15 Twitter Chat Summary

To gear up for the Borlaug Dialogue in Des Moines next week – where Farming First will be acting as media partner to hosts the World Food Prize Foundation – we ran a Twitter Chat with leading spokespeople at the event and Farming First supporters.

Ambassador Kenneth M. Quinn, President of the World Food Prize Foundation kicked the discussion off with reasons why agriculture is such an important tool for poverty reduction.

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Ambassador Quinn was joined by the Director of Agricultural Development at the Gates Foundation, Pamela Anderson. She had this response to why the empowerment of youth and women in agriculture can make such a big impact:

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Winner of the 2015 World Food Prize, BRAC also joined the debate. When asked how we can ensure technologies end up in the hand of farmers, they introduced the idea of “frugal innovation”.

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Farming First supporters Dr. Katrin Glatzel of Agriculture for Impact, and Jay Kaufman of Fintrac also joined the discussion. They shared their ideas on how to ensure that development interventions are holistic and tackle more than one area of development.

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The live debate then kicked off, and 12 viewers submitted real-time questions for our panel to tackle. Adam Willman asked about the refuge crisis:

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Chandra Nath Misha asked how more investment can be channeled into staple crops:

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Farming First will be in Des Moines all next week, bringing you live commentary from the conference and posting a series of exclusive expert blogs. Follow @farmingfirst and stay tuned to #FoodPrize15!

For a full recap of the one-long chat, click the Storify tweet collection below.

 

#Nexus2020 Twitter Chat Summary – “The Most Important Questions for Business”

In celebration of World Environment Day (5 June 2015), Farming First and the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL) hosted an engaging twitter chat on the Nexus2020 project around the most important questions for business.

Over 300 tweets were shared during the chat; exploring what research is needed to help business manage their dependencies and impacts upon food, energy, water and the environment (FEWE). Asking the right questions is an important first step for enhancing business sustainability – and CISL are calling for input from people from all backgrounds and expertise. If you’d like to help them collect more questions, email nexus2020@cisl.cam.ac.uk

The expert panel included Dr Bhaskar Vira (Director of the Conservation Research Institute), Richard Black (Director of the Energy & Climate Intelligence Unit), Chris Gerrard (Climate Change and Biodiversity Manager at Anglian Water), Eileen Hoffman (Director of the Economic Growth and Trade, Chemonics International) and Gemma Cranston (Senior Programme Manager at the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership). (Check out the full biographies of the panelists here)

Did you miss our chat? Want to submit more questions? Tweet your question using #Nexus2020 or submit it via the electronic submission form here.

Discussions were based around five guiding questions that Farming First put forward to the panel:

Q1 How do businesses impact & depend on food, energy, water & environment (FEWE)? What can be done to make these impacts and dependencies more sustainable?

Q2 How can research help businesses manage FEWE impact and dependencies? Research needs to be relevant and practical for business. Should business play an active role in this research design process?

Q3 How do business practices affect other stakeholders operating within FEWE? What research could improve interaction? Business impacts can have a ripple effect on many other stakeholders and considering these interactions is crucial. Can research alleviate some of these trade-offs and tensions? 

Q4  How does policy influence business practices around FEWE? Could research around policy interventions enhance management? There are a number of political frameworks in place that help guide business towards better management, but these policies need to be backed by some thorough research.

Q5 How do consumers influence business practices around FEWE? Could research in this space improve management? Civil society and consumers also have a role to play in guiding business practices and management. Do we need more research about the dynamics between consumers and businesses?

Panelists responded with insightful and provoking responses:

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A number of other participants enabled the discussion to spontaneously evolve through real-time questions of their own:

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Everyone, from audience to panelists, reinforced the idea that not only a larger amount, but also better targeted research is necessary for businesses to sustainably manage their impacts and dependencies on food, energy water and the environment. Important questions were raised about the role of policy and legislation, ecosystem markets, tools and techniques, education and awareness, data and analytics, scalability, and incentives for action in influencing business practices.

Thanks to all of you who submitted questions – keep in the loop and submit more questions using #Nexus2020 or by clicking here.

Did you miss the chat? Explore the chat’s main content below:

JUN52015
#Nexus2020 Twitter Chat: Bridging the Gap Between Business and Research

Friday 5 June 2015 | Online

LIVE at 10am EST / 3pm BST

Nexus2020 is a project that brings together business, academics, policy makers and civil society to determine the most important research questions that need to be answered around food, energy, water and the natural environment to inform business practice.

The project wants to uncover: what are the most important questions around business practice that, if answered, could help companies manage their dependencies and impacts upon food, energy, water and the environment?

To celebrate World Environment Day, the Cambridge Institute of Sustainability Leadership and Farming First are inviting you to have your say in our online Twitter Chat featuring panelists from academia, business and research.

Do you want to know how to deliver enough food for more people with less water? Or how to meet increasing demand for energy without exacerbating climate change? What about the allocation of land in the face of these competing demands and increasing pressures to address conservation goals?

We want to know what you think is the most important question around business practice that, if answered, could help companies manage their dependencies and impacts upon food, energy, water and the environment. Got an idea now? Submit it here!

Can YOU submit a question that will feature as one of Nexus2020’s top 10 priority research areas?

Tune in and debate priority research areas that could impact business practices.

Use the #Nexus2020 hashtag, follow our panelists and we will see you on Twitter!

Need some help navigating the #Nexus2020 twitter chat? Download our guide here or for more information email Hannah at nexus2020@cisl.cam.ac.uk

Guiding questions:

Q1 How do businesses impact & depend on food, energy, water & environment (FEWE)? 

What can be done to make these impacts and dependencies more sustainable?

Q2 How can research help businesses manage FEWE impact and dependencies?

Research needs to be relevant and practical for business. Should business play an active role in this research design process?

Q3 How do business practices affect other stakeholders operating within FEWE? What research could improve interaction?

Business impacts can have a ripple effect on many other stakeholders and considering these interactions is crucial. Can research alleviate some of these trade-offs and tensions?

Q4  How does policy influence business practices around FEWE? Could research around policy interventions enhance management? 

There are a number of political frameworks in place that help guide business towards better management, but these policies need to be backed by some thorough research.

Q5 How do consumers influence business practices around FEWE? Could research in this space improve management? 

Civil society and consumers also have a role to play in guiding business practices and management. Do we need more research about the dynamics between consumers and businesses?

Expert Panel

CISL panelistDr Bhaskar Vira, Founding Director, University of Cambridge Conservation Research Institute @Bhask286

Bhaskar is founding director at the Conservation Research Institute. Bhaskar has contributed to the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment and the UK National Ecosystem Assessment, and the IUFRO Global Forest Expert Panel on Biodiversity, Forest Management and REDD+, as well as a member of the Royal Society Working Group on Human Resilience to Climate Change and Disasters. Bhaskar is closely involved with groups such as the Cambridge Conservation Initiative, and the Global Food Security strategic research initiative.

Richard BlackRichard Black, Director, Energy & Climate Intelligence Unit @_richardblack

Richard is director at the Energy & Climate Intelligence Unit. Richard studied Natural Sciences at Cambridge University before joining BBC World Service in 1985 as a studio manager. As BBC Environment Correspondent, his reporting assignments included many UN summits including five UNFCCC meetings and Rio+20. He reported from the field on issues such as carbon capture and storage, nuclear power, amphibian conservation, whaling, forestry, aquaculture and earthquake prediction. From 2012 Richard was Director of Communications for the Global Ocean Commission prior to setting up ECIU. 

Chris GerrardChris Gerrard, Climate Change and Biodiversity Manager, Anglian Water @chrisgerrard

Chris is Anglian Water’s Climate Change and Biodiversity Manager. Prior to that, Chris of was Director of Living Landscapes for the Wildlife Trust for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire. Chris was also Project Manager of the Great Fen Project, a leading landscape-scale conservation project between Huntingdon and Peterborough. Chris is author of “The Great Fen: Artists for Nature in England” and co-wrote two local Red Data Books.

James WilsdenProfessor James Wilsdon, Director, the Nexus Network @jameswilsdon

James is director of the Nexus Network and leads its core team. Based at the University of Sussex, he is Professor of Science and Democracy in the Science Policy Research Unit (SPRU). He is also Chair of the Campaign for Social Science, and was formerly Director of Science Policy at the Royal Society.

 

Screen Shot 2015-06-03 at 09.51.20Eileen Hoffman, Director of the Economic Growth and Trade, Chemonics International @Eileen4EGT

Eileen is Director of the Economic Growth and Trade at Chemonics International. Eileen has 14 years of experience in over 20 countries. She has worked on a range of projects, including private sector competitiveness, workforce development, MSME and entrepreneurship development, household economic strengthening, and local economic development in both rural and urban settings.

Screen Shot 2015-06-03 at 10.49.56Gemma Cranston, Senior Programme Manager of the Natural Capital Leaders Platform, Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership @GemmaCranston

Gemma Cranston is a Senior Programme Manager at Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership. Gemma works within the Natural Capital Leaders Platform, which brings together influential companies with a global reach to work on addressing the impacts of natural capital loss and degradation on business, their customers and wider society.  She is leading projects focusing upon the nexus of food, water, energy and the environment and is involved with the Natural Capital Coalition in the development and business engagement of the Natural Capital Protocol.

 

MAY192015
Twitter Chat: Innovation in Global Water & Food Security for Women

19th May 2015

10 am – 11 am EST

On May 19th, USAID’s Securing Water for Food Program will host its first-ever Twitter Chat to raise awareness around the role innovation in global water and food security and how it benefits women. Follow @securingwater and #WaterAgWomen to join a panel of experts hosting a live chat around this crucial topic and answering questions posed by users.

According to Goldman Sachs, “Water is the petroleum of the next century.” The demand is ever increasing. Currently, agriculture accounts for 70% of all global water demand and 55% of traditional irrigation water is wasted. Clearly this is an area ripe for innovation. Securing Water for Food: A Grand Challenge for Development (SWFF) is currently accepting applications for its 3rd Call for Innovations to increase water availability and promote efficient use of water in agriculture.

The Challenge closes on May 22nd at 5pm EST, so apply now with groundbreaking technologies or business models—especially those that prioritise the engagement of women in water and agriculture.

Up to 30 innovators are expected to receive between $100,000 and $3 million in funding and acceleration support so get your application in now atwww.securingwaterforfood.org/round-3-call-3/

DEC52014
Farming First #IYS2015 Twitter Chat “Healthy Soils for a Healthy Life”

Friday 5th December 2014

10am EST / 3pm GMT

We will soon be entering International Year of Soils, and the soil we use to grow our crops will move to centre stage in the food security debate.

Land degradation currently affects nearly one-third of the earth’s land area. The impacts this has range from reduced soil fertility and lower crop yields to reduced soil carbon sequestration that would mitigate climate change, as well desertification and rural migration. Smallholder farmers in the developing world are impacted most heavily; in sub-Saharan Africa it is estimated that 65 per cent of land is degraded, which is a major barrier to food production. Worldwide, the economic loss associated with land degradation is estimated to cost us USD 40 billion per year.

Healthy soils are the foundation of a productive food system, improved rural livelihoods and a healthy environment. When so many still go hungry – we must focus on protecting and restoring our soils.

How can we seize the opportunity this global event presents to sustain our soils?

Join our panel of experts for the Twitter Chat “Healthy Soils for a Healthy Life” on Friday 5th December at 10am EST / 3pm GMT and tweet @farmingfirst with your questions, using the hashtag #AskFF

Expert Panel

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Amit Roy, President, International Fertilizer Development Center (IFDC) – @AmitRoyIFDC / @IFDCNews

Amit Roy has been the president and CEO of IFDC since 1992. Under his leadership, IFDC’s programs have broadened to help create sustainable agricultural productivity around the world, alleviating hunger and poverty and ensuring global food security, environmental protection and economic growth.  He was instrumental in organizing the Africa Fertilizer Summit in Nigeria; founded Virtual Fertilizer Research Center in Nigeria and co-leads the Global TraPs project.  

 

RICHARD MKANDAWIRERichard Mkandawire, Vice President, African Fertilizer and Agribusiness Partnership (AFAP) – @R_Mkandawire / @AFAPPartnership

For eight years, Richard Mkandawire was part of the leadership that drove the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP). CAADP began as part of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) to eliminate hunger and reduce poverty by growing agriculture. He is now the Vice President of AFAP, bringing decades of experience as a socio-economist and rural development expert to the organisation. 

 

MachteldMachteld Schoolenberg, YPARD Representative, Netherlands – @MachteldAnna / @YPARD

Machteld is a policy researcher with a Masters in International Land and Water Management and specialized in land degradation, rural development and sustainable land management practices. Machteld currently works as a policy researcher at the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL). She mainly works in research projects on land degradation and restoration. But also contributes on projects about natural capital, land use innovations in the EU and social media strategies. 

 

Juliet Bjuliet_braslow1raslow, Soil Research Area Coordinator, Centro International de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT) – @JulietBraslow / @CIAT_

Juliet holds a Masters in Horticulture & Agronomy and another in International Agricultural Development. Based in Nairobi, Kenya she has a diverse background of skills ranging from soil management and agricultural extension to international development. She is interested in interdisciplinary and participatory research in natural resource management and effective science communication, especially when it comes to communicating the importance of soil.  

 

Ronald

Ronald Vargas, Soils Officer, Global Soil Partnership – @FAOKnowledge

Ronald is Soils Officer and Secretary of the Global Soil Partnership Secretariat at the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations with strong focus on the survey, assessment and management of soil resources globally.

APR162014
#2020Resilience Twitter Chat

Wednesday 16th April, 10am – 11am EDT on Twitter

Join the conversation!

Poor people and communities are being hit by shocks ranging from droughts, floods, and earthquakes to conflict and food price spikes, and these shocks are putting people’s food and nutrition security at risk.

It’s time to rethink how people and communities can be helped to become more resilient to these shocks. The international conference “Building Resilience for Food and Nutrition Security“, held by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) on 15-17th May will debate just that – and we invite you to be part of the discussion online.

Join experts from Farming First and the IFPRI on Twitter at 10am EDT on Wednesday 16th April to debate the issues with our experts:

 

jay-kaufman-fintracJay Kaufman is Senior Vice President of Field Operations at Fintrac. He has two decades of experience providing support and oversight to multi-year agricultural development projects in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean. He is an expert in market analysis and commercial distribution channels; smallholder and local partner grants administration; and agricultural sector rehabilitation post-disaster. @fintrac

 

 

Image of Tenna Shitarek

Tenna Shitarek is Farm Africa’s Programme Manager for Quality in Ethiopia. Prior to working at Farm Africa Tenna worked as a consultant and he produced a number of important evaluations and reports on a range of topics including economic resilience and disaster risk reduction. He is also the co-author of “The Economics of Early Response and Disaster Resilience: Lessons from Kenya and Ethiopia”@farmafrica

 

 

ruth meinzen-dick ifpriRuth Meinzen-Dick is Coordinator of the CGIAR program on Collective Action and Property Rights (CAPRi). Her research deals with water resource management, land, forests, property rights, collective action, and the impact of agricultural research on poverty. She leads IFPRI’s Gender Task Force and co-leads work on strengthening women’s assets. Much of her research has been in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. @ifpri

 

 

clemens breisinger ifpriClemens Breisinger is an economist and research fellow at IFPRI’s Development Strategy and Governance Division. Since 2010, Clemens leads the Middle East and North Africa team, which provides knowledge, strengthens capacity and aims at influencing policy and investment decisions for an Arab World free of poverty and malnutrition. @ifpri

 

 

agnes quisumbing ifpriAgnes Quisumbing is a senior research fellow at IFPRI and co-leads a research program that examines how closing the gap between men’s and women’s ownership and control of assets may lead to better development outcomes. Her past work at IFPRI analyzed the factors that enable individuals, households, and communities to move out of poverty over the long term, and on how resource allocation within households and families affects the design and outcome of development policies. @ifpri

Questions to be addressed:

How is ‘resilience’ relevant to agricultural development?
Which trends are currently threatening people’s resilience?
Which programs are succeeding in building farmers’ resilience?
How can ‘resilience’ be incorporated into the post-2015 development goals?

Tweet us YOUR questions for the experts, using the handle @farmingfirst or @ifpri using the #2020Resilience hashtag!