Stories tagged: innovation

Conserving Africa’s Precious Resource Base While Fighting Hunger

As part of our agroecology in action series, Kalongo Chitengi, Zambia Country Director, Self Help Africa speaks to Farm Africa about the importance of sustainable agriculture and responsible farming for preserving Africa’s environment and ecosystems.

Rosemary Chate’s seven children gather around the table inside their home in Malela, a village in Zambia’s remote Northern Province. They dig their spoons into bowls of food prepared by their mother – for the second time that day.

Not long ago, Rosemary Chate’s family would assemble to eat just once a day – their resources, for many months each year, were so thin that they needed to ration their food supplies to just a single family meal.

This is the reality for millions of African farmers like Rosemary. Many challenges are keeping yields on the continent low. Farmers lack access to inputs that farmers in developed countries have utilized for decades, from quality seeds and herbicides, to the right type of fertilizer for their undernourished soils. The hand hoe – even in this century – is still the main tool for smallholder families. Migration to urban areas and the impact of AIDS have left many rural homesteads with a labour shortage.

75% of Africa’s soil is degraded, costing African countries up to 10% of their GDP. Yet Africa has almost 50% of the world’s uncultivated land (Source: IFPRI)

Climate change has also emerged as another challenge, and rural families grapple with adaption. Changes in the climate have brought with them not only drought and flooding, but new plant diseases and insect attacks. The fall armyworm in sub-Saharan Africa has caused tremendous damage. This unpredictable reality has made crop management very difficult, and indigenous knowledge alone can no longer suffice.

African farmers need scientific innovation – from low to high tech – to face these challenges.

Testing vitally important to ensure that farmers are using the right tools and innovations to make sure soils are healthy (Credit: Georgina Smith/CIAT)

Yet preserving Africa’s environment, its most precious resources after its people, is also a high priority. This is one of the fundamental concerns of agroecology – ensuring farmers can produce food and earn a good living, while keeping the natural resource base intact.

With the right approaches that blend traditional knowledge with scientific innovation, this can be achieved.

At Self Help Africa, we are working with farmers to achieve this through the implementation of conservation agriculture. In Zambia alone, we have reached over 80,000 farmers  in the last five years.

Conservation farming involves a combination of approaches. First, farmers are encouraged to intercrop a variety of species, such as groundnuts, which can naturally fix nitrogen to the soil, and cassava, for example. This ensures maximum use of a piece of land that has been cleared – producing more food with less resources.

Crop rotation and mulching, along with an integrated use of mineral and organic fertilizers are also part conservation agriculture.

59-year old Felister Namfukwe has seen the benefits of this farming approach. Not only are her soils healthier, but her income is as well. With the help of her sons and her profits from groundnuts, she is building a new home made of brick, replacing her previous mud home.

“Being part of this (Self Help Africa) project has lightened my burden,” she told us.

We also work with local farmers to build their capacity to grow good quality seed, and to strengthen community based seed systems. Recycling seed is a common practice in Africa, when access to better seed is scarce. However, recycled seed loses its efficacy.

We are currently working with 300 seed growers across the country, who are multiplying seeds that are more able to cope with climate extremes, are higher yielding and more resistant to pests and disease.

In Zambia’s remote Western Province, the Kamasika Seed Growers Association illustrates how effective community-based seed multiplication is assisting local food production in the face of climate change.

The group received training and support in seed multiplication techniques from Self Help Africa and government advisors on the technical requirements for producing certifiable seed. The farmers were then linked to a new state-run seed testing laboratory, established with support from Self Help Africa in nearby Mongu town, to ensure that the seed being produced met the requisite germination, moisture content and other standards required to attain certification.

The group has since opened several retail shops where they sell farm inputs, including certified groundnut, bean, sorghum, maize and vegetable seed that they are producing, and supply to several thousand smallholder farmers across the Province.

African farmers are most at risk from rising temperatures and persistent hunger. We must ensure they have access to all the tools and technologies necessary to thrive in the face of these threats.

 Featured photo credit: WFO

JAN132017
3rd Future Agro Challenge Global Championships

Application deadline: 13th January 2017

Main event: 12-15th March 2017

Johannesburg, South Africa

Over 50 world-class agribusiness innovators will compete for the tittle of the Most Innovative Agripreneur of the Year at the 3rd Future Agro Challenge (FAC) Global Championships, that will take place in Johannesburg, South Africa, from March 12-15, 2017.

Apply now!

 http://futureagrochallenge.com/the-challenge/apply

As the world’s leading competition, FAC mobilises local communities all over the world to discover innovative and fundable ventures in Food, AgTech and Agriculture, addressing national, regional and global challenges from farm to fork. Future Agro Challenge is a featured event of the Global Entrepreneurship Congress, an event that will bring together about 5,000 attendees including entrepreneurs, researchers, investors, policymakers and business leaders from all over the world. This intense four-day experience is aimed at connecting innovators with investors and key stakeholders in the agribusiness sector. Participants will have access to gain insights to best practices, win over potential customers, partner with other agripreneurs across markets, and receive media attention.

The event will be hosted in part by Industry Disruptors, USAID, Sweden (through the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency), the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, and the South African Department of Science and Technology, which is also a co-host of the Global Entrepreneurship Congress. Read more >>

 

Sir Gordon Conway: 11 Innovations for African Smallholder Agriculture

Our guest author, Sir Gordon Conway from Agriculture for Impact, discusses his new report, which calls for more multidisciplinary, collaborative research at a range of scales for African agriculture. The report is being launched today at the World Food Prize in Des Moines, Iowa.

In my latest report, “Innovation for Sustainable Intensification in Africa”, my co-authors and I call for a new wave of ingenuity, creativity and innovation to address the interlinked challenges which the African agricultural sector faces.

On one side, the population is expected to double by 2050, while over 200 million Africans already go hungry and average yields remain the world’s lowest.  On the other side, poor market access, soil degradation and the impacts of climate change (among others) add extra pressure to farmers’ productivity and livelihoods.

In short, we must help African smallholder farmers produce more with less impact on the environment while also improving agriculture’s sustainability.

Multiple benefits

Finding innovations which deliver on these multiple benefits is possible, and here are 11 such innovations showing promise for African smallholder farmers:

  1. StrigAway Imazapyr Resistant (IR) maize: Yields are 38-82% higher than traditional maize varieties, while growth of the Striga weed is effectively controlled and labour requirements reduced.
  2.  Conservation agriculture: A series of 286 interventions in 57 developing countries saw an average increase in crop yield of 79% along with better and more productive soil structure.  An average total of 0.35 tons of carbon (per hectare per year) can potentially be sequestered and water use efficiency gains are seen in rainfed areas.
  3.  Microdosing: Field trials in Zimbabwe showed a 30-50% increase in grain yields.  In West Africa, similar trials increased millet and sorghum yields by 44-120%. Precise and targeted use of fertiliser increased nutrient use efficiency and aids in drought tolerance.
  4.  Orange-fleshed sweet potatoes: The Tainung variety in Kenya yields three times more than traditional varieties, is drought tolerant and quicker to mature.  A small portion (125g) provides children with over twice the recommended daily allowance of vitamin A.  In field trials in Uganda and Mozambique, vitamin A intake by women and children doubled.
  5.  Water Efficient Maize for Africa (WEMA): The aim is to increase yields by 20-35% under moderate drought compared to conventional varieties and to increase yields 12-24% in high drought conditions while building in resistance to pests such as stem borers.
  6.  Kenya Maize Development Programme: From 2002-2010 maize yields quadrupled from 720kg to 2880kg per 0.4 hectares, and annual household incomes increased by $533 or $1.46 per day. The programme provided farmers with practical, on-farm training on improved varieties of seed and fertilizer, conservation tillage and other sustainable natural resources management practices.
  7. Purdue Improved Cowpea Storage: Yields are unaffected, yet post-harvest losses are significantly reduced. Harvests can be stored up to a year, and farmers can sell their cowpeas when prices are up to four times higher.
  8.  Zaï systems: In Burkina Faso, grain yield increased by 120%, equivalent to around 80,000 tons of extra grain per year, with the added benefit of improving infiltration in the soil, limiting water run-off, enhancing drought tolerance and protecting seeds and soil from erosion.
  9.  Farmer Field Schools: In Kenya, crop production increased 80% as a result of participation in these schools, and participants increased their incomes by 61%. In Tanzania, agricultural incomes of participants increased by over 100%.  These schools can be beneficial to typically marginalised groups, and better knowledge also contributes to sustainable agricultural practices generally.
  10. Ethiopia Commodity Exchange: Since starting in 2008 the value of trade has risen from 2.7 billion birr (approximately $143 million) to 20 billion birr ($1.05 billion). Market prices are transparent, quality grades are standardised and contracts are enforced.
  11. Faidherbia: These trees have the curious habit of shedding their leaves during the rainy season, providing nutrients to crops underneath. Maize under Faidherbia albida yielded an average of five tons per hectare compared to two tons per hectare without.  The trees are also a potential source of fodder and firewood and help retain soil cover for enhanced fertility and protection from erosion. Nutrient levels were 42%, 25% and 31% higher with Faidherbia canopies than without for total nitrogen, potassium, and organic carbon respectively.

Editor’s Note:

All citations for the statistics above can be found directly in the report, “Innovation for Sustainable Intensification in Africa”.

JUL152013
Africa Agriculture Science Week in Ghana

From the 15 – 20 July leading agriculture experts and scientists from around the world will gather in Ghana to discuss solutions for food security in Africa .

The Forum for Agricultural Research in Africa (FARA) is collaborating with the Government of Ghana through the Ministry of Environment, Science, Technology and Innovation (MESTI) and the Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MoFA) to organise the 6th Africa Science Week, where enhancing Africa’s capacity for agricultural innovation will be at the forefront of discussions. 

Farming First will be interviewing key attendees at the event for Farming First TV, for more information about the event click here

 

 

State of the World 2011 Report : Agricultural Innovation for Food Security and Poverty Reduction in the 21st Century

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Dozens of farmers, activists, academics and journalists are clubbing together to produce the Worldwatch Institute’s State of the World 2011 report on “Innovations that Nourish the Planet”. The contributors to the report are collectively challenging the global food community to identify the technical and institutional innovations that are most effective to helping feed sub-Saharan Africa.

The SOW11 report, to be released next January, seeks to highlight innovations that can address the challenges faced around the world: reducing hunger and malnutrition, enhancing environmental and agricultural sustainability, improving the lives of women and girls and be both economically feasible and scalable for farmers and the investment community.  The project will also consider the institutional infrastructures and partnerships necessary to achieve success from these innovations.

The Issues Paper, released prior to the report, provides an overview of the issues and approaches facing the world, to provide a larger international discourse to the authors’ contributions. The report recognises two perspectives on food security :

  • ‘Global Food Security’ which seeks to strengthen food supply chains to secure movement of products at low prices to vast populations of consumers.
  • ‘Food Security for the Poor’ which focuses on strengthening the capacities of smallholder farmers to supply adequate and quality food supplies at a local level.

The paper focuses on three challenges to highlight when exploring possible innovations:

  1. Innovations may be driven by or dependent on the policy discourse on food security within that area.        
  2. The food security agenda needs to be integrated with the agendas for climate action and ecosystem restoration.
  3. Innovations must empower farmers and communities to achieve bottom-up change.

The Worldwatch Institute intends to use the report to uncover the innovations that entrepreneurial farmers use, to promote their value to the global community and help advise foundations and international donors interested in supporting agricultural development. Additionally, by considering innovations and examples from many different perspectives, the SOW11 might help to improve understanding and communication among the different communities of discourse to help achieve food security together.