Stories tagged: GCARD

Supporting Farmers’ Organisations in Kenya to Empower Smallholder Farmers

As part of GCARD 2010, Farming First hosted a session entitled ‘Better Benefiting the Poor through Public-Private Partnerships for Innovation and Action.’ Within the discussions, our panel of experts addressed several case studies that present different ways that partnerships have helped to empower smallholder farmers around the world.

Edward Kateyia – IFAP/Kenya National Federation of Agricultural Producers

Empowering smallholder farmers in markets (ESFIM) is a programme covering 11 developing countries set up by IFAP, ECART, IFAD, Agricord, CTA and various local researchers in Kenya. The project’s overall objective is to generate demand-driven action research support to the policy activities undertaken by farmers’ organisations. By creating an enabling policy and regulatory environment as well as economic organisations and institutions, the initiative works to empower farmers to generate remunerative cash income from markets.

Promoting collaborative research, the study gave research support to nine national farmers’ organisations to help them produce a set of propositions that would help them voice their research requirements more effectively and help to initiate partnerships amongst research groups for executing their various activities.

A second phase of activities involved supporting farmers’ organisations with information to strengthen their research capabilities and access to knowledge. Through this, farmers’ organisations have an improved and increased capacity to collect, organise and exchange experiences, knowledge and information within an international network of researchers.

Creating Rural Wealth for Chilean Farmers Through Vegetable Seed Production Training

As part of GCARD 2010, Farming First hosted a session entitled ‘Better Benefiting the Poor through Public-Private Partnerships for Innovation and Action.’ Within the discussions, our panel of experts addressed several case studies that present different ways that partnerships have helped to empower smallholder farmers around the world.

Dr. Claudio Barriga – Agronegocios Lantinoamericanos Chile Ltda

The seed industry has been an important contributor in the improvement of general agricultural practices by small farmers. By working closely with growers, seed companies have helped build capacity and support farmers to meet quality standards.

Vegetable seeds, especially when hybrids are produced, involve manual pollination, a highly specialized work for which people have to be trained. Small farmers involved in this type of production normally work with family members, and occasionally with hired labour. As part of the production contract with the farmer, seed companies provide training to farmers as well as the funding needed to move ahead with the production cycle.

Harvesting of the crops is done on a coordinated basis with the seed company, who – depending on the vegetable species – provide the necessary equipment that collects the seeds during harvest.

Economic results of seed production have shown significant increases in rural family income and a rational land use, which, in some cases, has allowed for the production of two crops per year. Partnerships between small farmers and seed companies are enabling farmers to access new innovations that are providing important economic benefits.

Farming First Session at GCARD 2010: Public-Private Partnerships in Agricultural Research

At the first ever Global Conference on Agricultural Research for Development (GCARD) at the end of March, Farming First hosted one of the sessions for delegates from around the world.  The session looked at the role of public-private partnerships (PPPs) in agricultural research and how these will help achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

Led by Lindiwe Sibanda of FANRPAN and Joyce Cacho of Novus International, the panel showcased a number of case studies of successful partnerships to an audience representing science, farming, public, private and civil society organisations from all over the world, who later gathered to discuss the ways to strengthen partnerships to help advance agricultural development.

Out of these discussion groups, three main points emerged:FF at GCARD

  • Knowledge needs to be turned into something tangible and the key role of the private sector in delivering these products or services should not be underestimated.
  • The risks and benefits of all partners in a public-private partnership should be identified and agreed upon from the beginning in order to have clear objectives and responsibilities in place.
  • All partners need to think, plan and work on a much more collaborative level than ever before.

The Farming First background paper for the session offers an in-depth look at how partnerships between the public and private sectors can provide the necessary financing, training, monitoring and infrastructure to ensure that agricultural innovation is both adapted to the farmers’ needs and accessible to them. The paper also includes case studies of successful PPPs, exploring why they have worked well, and how their learnings could be shared. 

GCARD provided a crucial occasion for all key players, from farmer to donor, to debate the best ways for advancing agricultural research.  But whilst discussions help us to shape the future path of research, it is essential that these discussions are turned into viable solutions which are delivered to farmers themselves in the fields.  This imperative is clearly illustrated by GCARD author Uma Lele’s closing mantra, “We need action, action, action.” The Montpellier Roadmap marks the first step on that path.

At GCARD, Farming First also spoke with Sir Gordon Conway, an agricultural ecologist and professor of international development at Imperial College, London.  During the interview, which was broadcast by Reuters, Sir Gordon discussed the Green Revolution of the 1960s, looking at the potential for a similar agricultural revolution in Africa. The Guardian Katine site also featured the interview, highlighting the various challenges that Sir Gordon noted, such as a lack of infrastructure and poor soils, meaning that an African ‘green revolution’ would have to be led by local solutions.